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Posts Tagged ‘Boston art’

Community Colors at Harriet Tubman GalleryGreetings! I’m honored and happy to announce that I’ll be a part of the annual Community Colors art exhibit at the Harriet Tubman Gallery in Boston’s South End from November 5-December 12.

Opening reception:
Wednesday, November 5, 6-8 pm
Harriet Tubman Gallery, 566 Columbus Avenue

Not only is this collaborative art exhibit inspired by community, but it benefits Boston’s South End community as well: 20% of art sales goes to supporting high quality art programming for the Childrens’ Art Centre of the United South End Settlements.

Come join us!

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Dedham Street by Paula Ogier

Have you seen the time lapse video of Boston by Julian Tryba? It is quite beautiful. I recommend watching it on full screen to fully appreciate the perspectives.

Someone I know, who like me grew up in a small Midwestern town, recently remarked about this video: “This helps explain how a small-town girl falls in love with a city.” I couldn’t agree more.

Watch it here:  Layer Time Lapse Boston by Julian Trybo

Artwork pictured above:
Dedham Street (Copyright © 2009 Paula Ogier)

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On October 12, 2011, the Museum of Fine Arts Boston released the news that efforts to raise enough money to purchase and maintain artist Dale Chihuly’s 42-foot-tall lime green icicle tower had been successful. The museum received thousands of gifts totaling more than $1 million. The towering glass tree, which had been created for the MFA’s new Shapiro Family Courtyard, will continue to reside in this bright and airy glass-enclosed space.

The soaring sculpture weighs approximately 10,000 pounds. It is made up of 2,342 pieces of hand-blown green glass spikes.

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Greetings folks,

This is a quick post to mention an exhibit of my work in Boston at the new Japonaise Bakery & Cafe. These are digital paintings based on original photographs and paper collages. They’ve been giclée printed by a terrific Somerville-based photographer named Mark Peterson. (To see Mark’s photographs of Boston and far beyond, check out http://www.siteandsituation.com.) The color came out beautifully and I’m happy to see them framed and up!

Cheers, Paula

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Copyright © Paula Ogier 2010

Horizontally striped tights, furry animal-ear headbands, and sorcerer’s cloaks were out in full force in the Back Bay this past weekend as Boston hosted the annual Anime Boston Convention. This convention is billed as New England’s largest annual celebration of Japanese animation, comics, and pop culture. Activities started early in the morning and went until after midnight, and included a karaoke stage, game shows, anime industry panel discussions, Cosplay role-playing/fashion showing/contests, artists showing and selling their work, the Starlight Ball dance, a blood drive, and a hentai music video contest (for those over 18 years of age).

I stumbled upon it quite by accident while out for a walk, although I’d heard about it earlier in the week. During a conversation outside the Hynes Convention Center with a young man who works in a D.C. area anime shop, I learned the cost of an admission ticket was $60. As curious as I was about what was going on inside the convention center doors, I decided to pass on that in exchange for hanging around in front of the main entrance. There was plenty going on. (You can click on any of these photos to enlarge them.)

When I first began photographing the attendees I was content to go for candid shots. It wasn’t until another photographer came along and started asking costumed anime fans, “Would you mind posing for me?” that I realized how much these kids loved to pose. (Being 51 years of age, I think I’ve earned the right to call late teen and 20-somethings “kids.”) Once I became more conspicuous about my photo-taking, “Want me to pose for you?” was the question I heard most.

Eventually leaving my spot outside the convention center’s front entrance, I wandered up to the sunny outdoor plaza that fronts the Prudential Center’s food court, where I found a large assortment of anime lovers and a few particularly sweet scenes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As I strolled away down Boylston Street, I passed this lovely princess stationed outside the Gucci shop with an undisclosed number of attendants underneath her skirt.

 

All photographs © copyright Paula Ogier.

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So often people think of art as something to be viewed in a museum. Or, if you live in a city like Boston whose neighborhoods host an annual roster of artists’ open studios, you might think of it as something to be viewed within a very specific art scene on a particular schedule.

If you live in the Greater Boston area, I can’t encourage you enough to visit some of the local open studios. They take place in the spring and in the fall (for complete schedules, check with the Boston Open Studios Coalition at http://www.cityofboston.gov/art/visual/openstudios.asp). These are weekend-long events. During open studios, some artists can be found at retail and community outlets, but many can be visited in their work/live spaces. Brickbottom Artist Association in Somerville is one example of a work/live community, with almost 150 artists’ condos now occupying two buildings that were abandoned until the group purchased them in the early 80s. At 450 Harrison Avenue in Boston’s South End is the SOWA Artists Guild, which not only participates in annual open studios, but opens their doors to the public the first Friday evening of every month for a chance to meet the artists in their studios and see their work.

Franklin Cafe

Franklin Cafe

But looking beyond the planned art event, I’d like to point out that art is everywhere. If we’re open enough to notice it, it brings visual interest, charm, personality, and humor to our daily world.

There are some store signs in my neighborhood that remind me of this fact. On Shawmut Street in the South End of Boston, there is the Franklin Cafe’s sign with its simple wire sculpture of a martini glass; the metallic pig that burns white hot in the afternoon sun heralding chef Ken Oringer’s new Coppa restaurant; and the appropriately feathery image above the front entrance to Flock, a women’s apparel shop. (By the way, you can click on any of these images to enlarge them.)

Coppa

Coppa

Flock

In the North End of Boston, Modern Pastry Shop on Hanover Street (modernpastry.com) boasts a sign with a 1950s-inspired aesthetic (for all I know it may have been there that long), and the cigar parlor across the street from it known as Stanza dei Siga (stanzadeisiga.com) hangs its shingle from a robust likeness of a cigar, despite that this shop encourages shoppers to take part in the “hookah experience.”

Modern Pastry Shop

Modern Pastry Shop

Stanza dei Siga

Stanza dei Siga

In my South End neighborhood, local artist Yuko Adachi received a public art commission in 2008 for this treatment of a…hmmm, what exactly is that thing, anyway?…well, some kind of functional but drab utility box on the corner of Tremont and Dedham Streets. She’s turned it into a cosmic rainbow of light and color that makes me not mind one bit having to sit at that busy intersection waiting for the light to turn green.

Yudo Adachi's painted utility box, Tremont Street view

Yuko Adachi's painted utility box, Tremont Street view

Yuko Adachi's painted utility box, Dedham Street view

Yuko Adachi's painted utility box, Dedham Street view

Just around the corner from there is the Betances Plaza at Villa Victoria, with its vibrant, multi-textured mosaic mural made from ceramic and concrete. The beautifully optimistic Ramon Betances mosaic wall is forty-five feet long, and was created by 300 local children. It’s spectacular any time of day, but try to catch it in mid- to late-afternoon when the sun is far enough to the west to make it glimmer.

Villa Victoria Plaza mosaic wall

Villa Victoria Plaza mosaic wall

Villa Victoria mosaic detail

Villa Victoria mosaic detail

Villa Victoria mosaic detail

Villa Victoria mosaic detail

I couldn’t end this post without asking: Has anyone besides me noticed that the new Clarendon Back Bay building on the corner of Clarendon and Stuart Streets, when viewed from the south, looks like a dollar sign? Considering it has condos for sale from $900 to $1600 per square foot, can this merely be a coincidence?

Clarendon Place

Clarendon Back Bay

Let me know if you have any favorite public art!

Cheers,

Paula

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Take a Hike

"Walk, Don't Walk," copyright © Paula Ogier 2010

Artistic inspiration can be as cheap as going for a walk. Sometimes I walk for the fresh air and exercise, and sometimes for whatever surprises or familiarities I’ll encounter. The nipping wind surprised me today, and a block away from home I turned back to get a hat. I think it pays to be comfortable if I might be out for a while.

Before I moved here from South Florida sixteen years ago, I took it for granted that every morning when I opened the window blinds, the sun would be shining. This was not so in Boston. I arrived in Boston in January 1993, and although I thought it peculiar that news stations prattled on so much about the weather (this was New England, after all — wasn’t snow in winter normal?), I hadn’t actually realized that I wasn’t going to see the sun everyday.

It only recently occurred to me how my eye has grown to appreciate all the flavors of sky we have in New England. Sure, I still miss the omnipresent sun and clear skies of my South Florida life, most sharply during those short, dark days of December. Looking through my Boston-based artwork last week, though, I noticed many were named for the sky, if not defined by the sky’s evolving ambience. The sky has a big personality here and it speaks: fog, mist, rain, snow, haze, and every now and then, plain old blue.

I love the walk as physical tonic, and I love the walk as motion picture screen. The semi-hard mud of the dog park, the twisting and bare multi-fingered tree branches, the repeated pattern of swirled wrought iron rails gliding up the front steps of rowhouses. The young couple leaning into each other along the salmon-bricked sidewalk, the woman heading home to her kitchen with her grocery bags, the boy and his new dog.

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